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changing? is the flow of funds more into equities so far this year or not? >> it is, tyler. we're seeing more flows into equities this year which is a good trend. obviously, we've seen a cycle over the last four years, and that's really rocking the boat. and what we need to do is get people back to the middle. think about a diversifiy eied portfolio, we'll see people continue to buy as the population ages. we need to keep inflation in mind. equities are the only place that is really going to outpace inflation over long periods of time. and people investing in whether it's for accumulation or even income distribution, you need to be thinking about inflation when they think about their allocation to equities. >> brian, i want to ask you about we're all waiting for the s&p to hit its closing highs, just a few points away, for investors. and i guess for a market strategist, which is more important for you to see the strength of this rally? is it these new highs on 30 dow components or is it the s&p 500? >> it's really the s&p 500. for instance, we do not forecast 30 stocks. we forecast a tar
not last. that's why goldman sachs economist says the federal reserve is unlikely to change its easing monetary policy from this report alone. >> the question i think is more how many times months do you have to see to be convinced that is the underlying trend of job growth. if you have a long period at this kind of pace of course they would make some changes but really how sustainable is it and how are we going to be looking at this three or six months down the road. >> reporter: there were gains in construction and moving jobs, the service sectorith etail educion and health care leading the way added 179,000 jobs, but government employment dropped by 10,000, that could be a sign of things to come as the sequester spending cuts hit. overall, it's the third month in a row that job gains were above 200,000, but it brought back memories of last year when strong wintertime hiring only brought about a springtime swoon. for "nightly business report," steve liesman. >> that surprisingly good news about jobs is good news for all of us but is the turnaround taking place fast enough? i spoke wi
growth. if you have a long period at this kind of pace of course they would make some changes but really how sustainable is it and how are we going to be looking at this three or six months down the road. >> reporter: there were gains in construction and moving jobs, the service sector with retail education and health care leading the way added 179,000 jobs, but government employment dropped by 10,000, that could be a sign of things to come as the sequester spending cuts hit. overall, it's the third month in a row that job gains were above 200,000, but it brought back memories of last year when strong wintertime hiring only brought about a springtime swoon. for "nightly business report," steve liesman. >> that surprisingly good news about jobs is good news for all of us but is the turnaround taking place fast enough? i spoke with the chairman of the president's council of economic individualsers, alan krueger, about what more needs to happen. >> i think today's report and other indicators that have been coming in on unemployment insurance claims and car sales suggest that the
throughout the day. >> shawn likes what he sees. >> it's nice. but honestly it doesn't change my day to day life. >> what are people doing about it? one sold some of his boeing stock and moved it to cash. another is concerned that a muni bond fund may be part of a bubble. >> i'm feeling pressure to move that money out of there. >> when we asked people on twitter what they're doing, most said they are checking them more often and a few are starting to make changes. >> contemplating dumping bonds but can't find a good alternative. moved half from equities to money market. got a bad feeling. but it was countered, adding more risk as long as big ben is here, so am i. >> advisors are being bombarded with questions about where to go from here. >> it's not about timing the market. it's about time in the market. >> in the meantime it's de ja vu all over again. back to the days when checking your 401k was something you looked forward to rather than dreaded. >> well the rise in stocks may have many americans feeling better about their portfolios. the ceo of general electric today warned that overregu
haven't changed a lot. sentiment, however, has. we are seeing investors become more confident in equities. our clients will have to set up the time horizon and hit a portfolio that really meets the goal that they are trying to accomplish. >> i didn't hear you mention the word cyprus once in that first paragraph or two of your thinking. do you think that the worries over cyprus are overblown? >> it is very small. it is .2% of the e.u. forget the global markets. it is very, very small. cyprus has the potential to represent contagion. if cyprus like greece before, if that were to infect let's say spain or italy it would become an issue. if it doesn't it becomes localized. the big issue in cyprus that is troublesome is they have their version of the fdic which is deposit insurance. that is rule of law. if they were to break that for financing purposes that would be very, very different. cyprus when you compare that to the u.s. housing which is positive and may be offsetting in terms of what washington has taken away by tax increases and sequestration it is a small episode. >> let'
, fiscal follies in the united states. what did it take to change the fed's view of where the economy is, and specifically change its view of buying bonds or the level of interest rates? >> i think we'd have to see some dramatic changes in europe in the fiscal situation in the u.s. to make them feel comfortable. but there's less of that extreme risk that's going to hit. also we'd have to see a lot more data that the recovery in, for example, the labor market, has really taken root. you saw the green shoots before, a few months of more than 200,000 private sector jobs being created. but then, things kind of wilted. and never really took root. and the fed had to do more. i think they're going to be really wary of pulling the punch bowl away too early. they're going to want to make sure that those green shoots are firmly rooted and can probably withstand the chicago winter. >> randy, you talk about looking at the data, there is so much data that you can examine. for you, and especially as a former fed governor, what's the most important piece of data? is it the job market? >> i think it's e
-day winning streak. >> and the unfriendly skies. how frequent flier programs are changing. fasten your seat belts and make sure you're locked in and upright for this. ♪ >> good evening and welcome to our public television viewers. after days of having the focus wall street, today it shts to washington >> it sure did, tyler. there's an escalating budget battle waging in the capital after house republicans unveiled their latest federal budget proposal today with plans to slash the country's massive deficit and get government spending under control all without raising taxes. as senate depp democrats prepare their own budget plan, can congress and the president reach a bipart san budget compromise any time soon in hampton pearson takes a look. >> house republicans unveiled the blueprint they say balances the federal budget with just ending cutand no n tax hikes. at the top of the gop list of what's needed to achieve $4.6 trillion in spending cuts over the next decade is to repeal obama care, cut domestic programs from medicaid to college grants and require future medicare patients to bear mor
on the nasdaq today. more than 80 million shares changed hands while above the average daily volume there. shares were off theerly 3% this on a day when pre-orders where the company's z10 smartphone began. some are looking that the product as a potential make or break product for the smartphone pioneer. john ford explains. >> the blackberry, it used to be shorthand for coolest phone in the world. wall street types were obsessed with them and government workers, too. less than four years ago fortune named it the fastest-growing company, and now blackberry is on the ropes with the hopes pinned on this phone, the z10 which customers can pre-order online and come pick up at these at&t stores on march 22nd. >> what happened? the mainly the iphone. when it came out six years ago the iks phone started small, unlike the blackberry and every other smartphone it had a big touchscreen and one button in front. now the iphone is the best-selling model in the country and every other popular phone looks a lot more like this than like this. the names to beat in today's phone game are apple and google who
you -- nobody is really expecting any significant change in policy. but do you expect any change in tone and conversation? and how might that impact investor confidence? >> i think today, again, i don't think ey're going to ke a real substantial change at this meeting. but you're already hearing a different tone among fed members copping out. you know, clearly the economy has gone from crisis in 2008 to now recovery. it might still be weaker than people want, but it's out of crisis. but federal reserve policy is still very crisis-like in aggressive and unconventional. and i think there is a big disconnect there. if the economy continues to improve, you're going to have more pressure coming on the fed to try to normalize its policy. and i think you're already hearing conversations. and you might hear more of that rhetoric next week. >> all right, jim paulson of wells capital management, thanks very much. coming up, we're going to look at some individual stock picks in our market monitor segment. >>> well, if you've been investing more money in your gas tank lately, you've been pay
alone. the big change will be small groups, they will have access to exchanges where their employees can now have a choice across a wide variety of health insurance plans. >> does the affordable care act ban lifetime maximum pay outs under plans and might that under the group setting raise premiums eventually? >> maybe a little bit. but again, it's interesting, the conversation tends to focus on the cost. let's step back and look at the big picture. we are saying that no longer will you be bankrupted because you get hit by a car stepping off the curb. in return, cost may go up a bit. that is a tradeoff we should be willing to make as a society. >> thank you for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> here is an interesting twist to the housing recovery that we have been talking about. pending home sales were weak because there were not enough homes on the market. these are contracts that were signed and not closed, they fell slightly more than expected. but the national association of realtors are saying that pending sales are near a three-year high. >> the nation's central bank pledged to kee
to grow, the latest showing on g.d.p. shows growth but just barely. >> susie: and a big management change at groupon: c.e.o. andrew mason is out at the daily deals site he co-founded. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: you know the economy is not very strong when analysts cheer because growth has been revised up by a "fraction," from a negative 0.10%. and with growth flat-lined, economists are wondering whether the upcoming budget cuts known as the "sequester" will derail the recovery. the good news is the cuts will take time to be felt. the bad news, as darren gersh reports, is the cuts will build in pain over time. >> reporter: in terms of its impact on the economy, the sequester is really more of a "slow" quester. the impact of the across the board spending cuts will take time to build and it could be months before its felt throughout the economy. students of government dysfunction say this is not the same as a government shut down or hitting the nation's borrowing limit. >> there is not that great an urgency. when we were talking about the debt ceiling, there was a r
back on investments, but retaining current consumption if you like. we have to change the mix there and maybe that will start to resonate out there with the american public and maybe then we'll be able to move forward with some sort of more reasonable fiscal path to the future. >> reporter: by easter, hoagland expects the sequester pain will probably be bad enough to force some sort of compromise, if not how bad is it going to be? what i'm hearing from a lot of people is the feeling this whole sequester thing is way overblown, is it? >> okay, play the washington number game with me for a minute. you heard the 2% number. "oh, it's only 2% of federal spending over the next 10 years. it's no big deal." but there's another washington number which is because of the way the sequester is structured, it's 10% to 13% in some programs this year. and that's going to cause some pain. >> susie: all right, well, talk us through this a little it. i mean, you have said that the automatic spending cuts are going to be gradual. they officially kick in at midnight tonight. so talk us through wha
, it might be the case that they're going to change that appetite for ever more reckless spending. and you noticed the concern economists have raised with this being unsustainable. they say ten years out, you're going to have an implosion if we don't change this course. this now begins to do that. i just wish we could reach an agreement where they're targeted like the legislation we passed over in the senate. >> right. >> we're still working to try to target the cuts. >> congressman, thank you very much for being with us this evening. >> thanks for the opportunity. >> appreciate it. coming up we take a look at things that are working and not working in the u.s. economy. in focus. the american recovery. now let's take a look at how the markets fared overseas this day. >>> as you probably noticed tonight is the beginning of a new chapter for "nightly business report" and i have a new partner tyler mathison and a new owner cnbc and we have a new set right here at cnbc headquarters in new jersey. but we will still bring you the same thing that "nightly business report" has been giving you for
will come in lower than expectations. the stock got slammed, down 7% to $12 and change. >>> an icon to dell, not so fast, financier carl icahn reportedly taking a 6% stake in the computer-maker dell. reports are that he doesn't really love founder michael dell's plan to team with a private equity firm and take the company private. icahn favors a different tact and has a different company, southeastern company management, another big dell shareholder so dell may be in play. dell posted gains for the day. >>> now, despite concerns about what the death of venezuelan president hugo chavez would mean to the energy market, crude oil closed lower, well off the session lows, rising after the federal reserve reported modest economic growth across the country. >>> and that brings us to the third installment of "nbr's" week long series called "in focus, the american recovery" and tonight we look at energy. here's sharon epperson. >> reporter: it was unthinkable a few years ago, but now u.s. energy independence appears to be within reach. the united states is virtually self-sufficient in natural gas su
and truthful. >>> google announcing an executive change in its android division. andy reuben is stepping down. who's andy reuben? he's the guy who developed the android operating system now used on roughly two-thirds of all the world's smartphones. he's going to stay with google in a yet to be disclosed role. shares were down, closing at 825 and change. >>> amazon is trying to get more consumers to buy its large-screen kindle so it's cutting the price by $100, undercutting apple's ipad. the kindle fire, the hd version, with wireless capability will now start at $399. amazon shares gained slightly to $273. >>> well, a clear message to j.c. penney's investors from the top management today. their chief financial officer, ken hannah, told the conference he's not resigning and the same goes for ceo ron johnson. hannah said, quote, we're not going to run and hide. jcp shares rose for a while but remained unchanged at $15.65. they're down 20% so far this year. >>> the securities and exchange commission is allowing four of the biggest banks, citigroup, jm morgan chase, bank of america and morgan stan
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)